On 6 July 2017, the last three of nine ragged-tooth sharks were added to the Two Oceans Aquarium's revamped Predator Exhibit. This brings an end to a year of building and planning, and sets us on an exciting path of optimising the exhibit. Over the coming months, we will decide which other animals to display along with the sharks. 

Please bear with us

Why is the water green?

Home aquarists will know from experience that fish tanks are living systems that are sensitive to changes in light and temperature conditions, and of course the animals in the water. The water quality of the exhibit is ideal for our raggies (they are known to frequent murky water), and our water clarity will improve as time passes. We are working on the exhibit every day to get it to optimal state; please bear with us. Due to poor visibility in the exhibit, there will be no shark feed at 15h00 on Sunday.

Because of exposure to sunlight there is some algae growing on the bottom of the exhibit, but our shade cloth that covers the exhibit is almost complete, and that will help us control the influence of the elements on the exhibit.

With the addition of Judd, Challen and Buck today, our exhibit has become a bit of a boys' club: there are five males and four females. 

Working with male ragged-tooth sharks is a new challenge for the Two Oceans Aquarium, but we are excited to be able to learn from this experience and to share our learnings with the aquarium community.

When a shark is introduced to the exhibit, our divers gently guide it around the display for a few laps until we can be sure that the shark's buoyancy is under control and it is confidently finding its way around the exhibit 

Why is the water green?

Home aquarists will know from experience that fish tanks are living systems that are sensitive to changes in light and temperature conditions, and of course the animals in the water. The water quality of the exhibit is ideal for our raggies (they are known to frequent murky water), and our water clarity will improve as time passes.

Because of exposure to sunlight there is some algae growing on the bottom of the exhibit, but our shade cloth that covers the exhibit is almost complete, and that will help us control the influence of the elements on the exhibit.

The immense Samtu, at over 2,5 metres long, is still the queen of the pool.

Samtu is more than 2,5 metres long

Moving sharks

Before entering the water, our team of vets and aquarists make sure that the sharks are in good health, and spend a lot of time removing small parasites called copepods that live on the sharks in the wild. 

Welcome to the Aquarium Challen! He is guided into the exhibit by Two Oceans Aquarium Aquarist Nicholas Nicolle

Moving sharks entails lots of heavy lifting, using a stretcher and crane, before being able to slip the shark gently into the water, making great use our new medical pool. 

Welcome to the Aquarium Judd!

Lily-May, Bernie and Dané (the first three sharks) are well adjusted to their new habitat. Together with Gen and Jeff they have been feeding voraciously - we think "hungry like a shark" should be a slogan at Vista Marina.

When is feeding time?

Visit us on Sunday at 15h00 to see the sharks being fed underwater by our divers. The penguins are fed at 11h30 and 14h30 every day, and the fish and turtles of the I&J Ocean Exhibit are fed at 12h00 and 14h00. Make a day of it and buy your tickets online to save 10%. 

Shark ambassadors

These sharks are ambassadors for their species, primarily playing an educational and awareness role, and in so doing helping us foster love and care for the environment by affording people from all walks of life the chance to come face to face with these majestic creatures. They also play an invaluable role in reversing the negative perceptions around sharks. And, in the long term, they are tagged and released and form part of important scientific studies. 

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